PRESS RELEASE


Franziska Furter
Ich taumeltürme


27 August to 8 October 2016
Opening reception: Friday, 26 August 2016, from 6 to 9pm


We are very happy to present new works by Franziska Furter (*1972 in Zurich) in her third solo
exhibition in the gallery.
The title of the exhibition is rather unusual for Franziska Furter, as the expression denotes the artist
as an acting subject. The uncommon title though follows a strategy by the artist in choosing titles for
her shows, by referring to one or several groups of works included in the exhibition. And so it is: One
of the three new groups of works is called „Ich taumeltürme“. The title surprises also for another
reason, as one can’t figure out the meaning of the verb. What does „taumeltürmen“ mean? Where
does the verb derive from? Which associations are evocated through the word. The artist borrowed
„taumeltürmen“ from a poem by Kurt Schwitters, published 1919 in the monthly journal Sturm
edited by Herwarth Walden:


Ich werde gegangen (I will gone)
Ich taumeltürme (I taumeltürme / abscondstagger)
welkes windes Blatt (withered windy leaf)
Häuser augen Menschen Klippen (houses eyes men cliff)
schmiege Taumel Wind (nuzzle stagger wind)
Menschen steinen Häuser Klippen (men stone houses cliff)
Taumeltürme blutes Blatt (Taumeltürme blooded leaf)


The immediacy of this Dadaistic sequence of words, whose semantic nonsense adumbrates
something, but is not clearly denoting it, fascinated Franziska Furter. „Ich taumeltürme“ – the
translation into English is nearly impossible, “ich türme” means “I abscond”, taumeln means to
stagger – opens up possibilities, allows a brief vague conception of the meaning of the word,
without that its meaning would concretize itself. In the first room Franziska Furter has
singlehandedly distributed a group of drawings, calling up associations – similar to the poem by
Schwitters – but immediately depriving them from the viewer. Several variations of drawings can be
distinguished: On the one hand some drawings allude to earlier groups of drawings and sculptures,
on the other hand they rely on new ideas for images pointing to future undertakings, as for example
overlaying letterings created with stamps or suggested Japanese sliding doors so called Shoji
encountered by the artist in her three months residency in Tokyo. The pennant drawings refer to her
large pennant installations. Often the drawings depict natural phenomena, as for example rain or
wind referring likewise to earlier groups of works like the Vision- or Drafts-drawings. In Franziska
Furter’s oeuvre the group Ich taumeltürme holds a special position: The group marks a turning point
a hinge, looking „taumeltürmerisch“ into the past by pointing at the same time into the future.
In the middle room of the gallery stands a large wooden table, on which scrimmage 33 small
porcelain figures. Her involvement with porcelain is a result of Franziska Furter’s sojourn in Japan in
spring 2016 – fascinated of the singular depictions of Japanese divinities, demons and mythological
figures. So developed hand-sized figures made out of porcelain recalling ghosts, little creatures.
Therefore Franziska Furter calls this group Ghost. Often these creatures withdraw, similar to the
poem by Schwitters, from an exact positioning. They seem to be in constant movement; an
impression further enhanced by the shimmering glazing. The figures are modelled out of the material
and hold a great haptic quality. The first porcelains developed the artist without looking. She
followed in an humorous allusion a phrase by Michelangelo, that the idea dozes within the artist just
has to strike the stone away. The little ghosts develop on the prosaic table a life of their own. They
form groups and unfold in a comparative viewing their particularities.
On the walls around the table hang six unframed drawings from the series of the Vision Cloud. This
series emerges since 2015. They are related to the Vision series from 2008, visualising
hallucinations, passages from one world to another and visions from comics and Manga books. The
drawings from the Vision Cloud series possess a more personal note than the Visions as they are
based upon Franziska Furter’s own observations from “her Cloud“: visual adjustments from her
daily life seen out of the corner of her eye, for example of things remembered, of things vanishing, of
speed or mist. Sometimes she incorporates something formalistic or substantial from earlier works
of her or from other artist’s work, she engages with.
The show reveals a view of an oeuvre that is constantly growing with unagitated consistency, with
humour and precision. Within a clearly defined system Franziska Furter creates works of great
forcefulness and poetry, offering in her shows to the viewer a variety of associations and emotions.